How do you write together and keep from killing each other?

Where do you get your story ideas?

Who writes the male POV in your books?

Your heroines or heroes all have to deal with the death of loved ones. Do either of you write from experience?

Your books have comforting, healing themes, though.

Your second book, AGAINST DOCTORS ORDERS, begins a series featuring the Sullivan brothers and they're all involved in law enforcement. How do you know so much about policemen?

The emergency room scenes with Dr. Molly Jordan are very realistic. Do you have medical backgrounds?

Are any of your characters based on real people?

 

1. How do you write together and keep from killing each other?

Good question! When we first decided to become team writers we weren't at all sure we could blend our very different writing styles without skirmishes or outright warfare. We knew we loved the plotting process. When we're together we walk. And we talk. Repeat those last two sentences several times and it describes our favorite sister times. We talked our way into a plot outline for REUNION FOR THE FIRST TIME and then ran for some paper and a pen when we finished our walk. We created a scene map and divided the scenes equally between us. Then we hunkered down in our respective home offices - Kathie in New Jersey and Pat in Illinois. Ah there's the key! Only kidding. We really loved every minute and never exchanged a single cross word. Really.

2. Where do you get your story ideas?

That's definitely a question for Kathie. She is so imaginative. Might be because she had an imaginary friend when she was little - Charlie. She either cast blame on Charlie for little naughty things she was suspected of doing by our Mom OR she blamed Pat. Kathie wants to interject here…It was Pat.

3. Who writes the male POV in your books?

We both do. It depends on the scene we're assigned. For us it makes the writing experience richer to have all the characters talking in our heads. And we think it makes a much better book. We blend our two distinctive literary voices into one unique voice.

4. Your heroines or heroes all have to deal with the death of loved ones. Do either of you write from experience?

Yes, we both do. Our father died when Pat was 19 and Kathie was 15. He was a seemingly healthy, strong housepainter one day and eleven days later he had succumbed to acute leukemia. The shock of that loss was devastating to us. He was a loving, lyrical Irishman who adored us and spoiled us rotten. Our mother was utterly devastated by the loss of her husband. Witnessing her grief, and trying to comfort her through it, had a profound effect on us, also.

5. Your books have comforting, healing themes, though.

Yes they do. Love heals. We know this from experience, also.

6. Your second book, AGAINST DOCTORS ORDERS, begins a series featuring the Sullivan brothers and they're all involved in law enforcement. How do you know so much about policemen?

We have Lieutenant Frank Cargola, a brave law enforcement officer in suburban Chicago, to thank for all of it. He patiently answers any question and analyzes any goofy scenario we dream up to make sure we're at least in the world of possibility.

7. The emergency room scenes with Dr. Molly Jordan are very realistic. Do you have medical backgrounds?

Nope. Pat worked for a pharmaceutical company and has a pretty good handle on some medical terminology and we both hated the shots that Dr. Cole, our real life pediatrician, gave us. But we owe the accuracy of medical scenes to Drs. Brandon Kramer and Michael Maugeri. They are wonderful physicians and kind, generous friends.

8. Are any of your characters based on real people?

Not a one. Except we name a female character and a male character after our parents in each book. They always play secondary roles but we think they have a lot of fun getting into our action.